Frequently Asked Questions by Individuals in Transition

People leave their jobs for many reasons and, regardless of why, they all share a few things in common. Individuals in career transition face uncertainty and challenging circumstances that impact their personal, financial and professional life. These challenges hold true whether you are a CEO and or an administrative staff person. Here are a few of the questions we often hear from clients in transition.

Navigating the Journey After Job Loss

Maybe you saw it coming, or perhaps it came as a complete surprise – either way, losing your job is tough. For many, it can be a pivotal moment in the trajectory of their life. Will you choose to change your career path or seek a similar role to the one you are leaving? How will you avoid compromising your career goals in the face of financial concerns and the inclination to get back to work quickly?

What More Could They Need to Know About Me?

The Role of Psychometric Assessment in the Selection Process.

So, you`ve thrown your hat in the ring and applied for a new job.  You`ve written a captivating cover letter and submitted your polished resume.  You have your references lined up and primed.  And then you have a screening interview which you nail.  And now, the recruiter has asked you to complete a psychometric assessment. Why?  What can an assessment possibly tell anyone about you that your cover letter, resume, interview, and references cannot?

The Personal Side of “Downsized”

Not to sound pessimistic, but sooner or later, almost everyone has to deal with the implications of being downsized. How people deal with it is as different as night and day. I’ve seen a wide and varied range of emotions and responses from those who experience job loss. How you deal with it can determine how quickly you turn-around and your ability to capture opportunities in front of you.

So you didn’t get the job: Three important tips to improve your chances on the next one.

Finding out you didn’t get the job when you had every qualification listed on the job description and you thought you aced the interview can be baffling and incredibly frustrating. No matter how strongly you feel, the way you react could make or break your chances of getting the offer in the future. Here are three things to keep in mind after getting that call:

Don’t take it personally

How to make your résumé work for you and not against you

Sometimes your résumé is your first impression. You may have perfected your interview skills, be passionate about the job and have some great experience to offer a  company but, if you can’t successfully articulate that in your résumé and cover letter, you may knock yourself out of the race before it even gets going. When it comes to applying for a job your résumé can really help you…or it can really hurt you.

Here are some tips to consider:

Ace the Interview: The Dos and Dont's to Consider

I was thinking the other day just how many interviews have I conducted? I've been doing this for 11 years and I probably on average interview four people a day, so based on 250 working days/year that's roughly 11,000 interviews! Other than feeling rather old all of a sudden, I feel somewhat equipped to comment on what makes a good interview since I've seen many good (and many not so good) over the years. Here are a few suggestions…

Establish rapport...